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White Steel No. 1

Shirogami #1, also known as White Steel # 1, has a higher carbon content than Shirogami #2. The higher the carbon content, the better a knife holds an edge; however, it becomes more brittle.

This is a very hard material made of pure carbon steel with fine-grained carbon, and very few contaminates within the iron. It is used in manufacturing the Honyaki knife by the traditional smith-making process. Only a few knife craftsmen can unlock the real value of this steel even in Sakai, so any kitchen knives made of Shirogami have become rare kitchen knives with value. These knives can be sharpened to an impressive razor's edge.

Shirogami #1, also known as White Steel # 1, has a higher carbon content than Shirogami #2. The higher the carbon content, the better a knife holds an edge; however, it becomes more brittle.

This is a very hard material made of pure carbon steel with fine-grained carbon, and very few contaminates within the iron. It is used in manufacturing the Honyaki knife by the traditional smith-making process. Only a few knife craftsmen can unlock the real value of this steel even in Sakai, so any kitchen knives made of Shirogami have become rare kitchen knives with value. These knives can be sharpened to an impressive razor's edge.

The Role of Steel in Japanese Knives

These white steel no. 1 knives are not just tools, they are extensions of a chef’s skill and passion. With their razor-sharp edges and meticulous craftsmanship, they are revered for their ability to transform ordinary ingredients into culinary masterpieces.

One of the unique characteristics of a white steel # 1 knife is its patina, a natural protective layer that forms on the blade over time. The patina not only enhances the knife’s appearance but also helps prevent corrosion, adding to the longevity of the blade. However, white steel no.1 knives require less sharpening but regular honing and maintenance, including drying to prevent rust.